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JAMES HORNER FILM MUSIC | September 24, 2017 |

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TOMMY TEDESCO

© Jon Sievert 1979
Thomas J. Tedesco (3 July 1930 – 10 November 1997) was one of the most in-demand studio guitarist between 1960 and 1980. The magazine Guitar Player referred to him as the most recorded guitar player of all time. He recorded with the greatest names of Los Angeles and around, including The Beach Boys, The Mamas & Papas, Barbra Streisand, Elvis Presley, Ella Fitzgerald, Franck Zappa, Ricky Nelson, Franck Sinatra.
Tedesco also worked for film scores and for numerous jazz guitar albums. 
 
Source: Wikipedia


 

Unreleased Project:
The Stone Boy, an intimate music finely orchestrated with guitar and female voice (Sally Stevens).
 

FOND MEMORIES - EPISODE 5: 1981-1983 - SIX TWO-HOUR TV MOVIES

This episode takes a look at the six TV movies James Horner scored between 1981 and 1983, and covers the following scores: Angel Dusted (1981) A Few Days In Weasel Creek (1981) PK and The Kid (1982) A Piano For Mrs. Cimino (1982) Rascals And Robbers: The Secret Adventures Of Tom Sawyer (1982) Between Friends (1983) If you have information that could supplement this episode, please do not hesitate to contact us.   After the two monster movies he did for Roger Corman (Episode 3) and while composing 1981’s horror trilogy (Episode 4), James Horner decided he was not going to be pigeonholed as a horror guy. Somewhat surprisingly,

IN COUNTRY: IN JEWELRY

  Many thanks to Regina Fake, for giving us the opportunity to write this article in the best possible conditions.  “There is no such thing as an absolute masterpiece. For my part, I like Cocoon, In Country and The Spitfire Grill very much indeed.” James Horner – 1998. We can never be sufficiently grateful to Douglass Fake and Roger Feigelson for finally releasing such a favourite Horner score, for which a place in our CD shelves had been reserved for a long time. For two decades we were certain that the brilliant music of Norman Jewison’s film deserved an album release. Intrada’s


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