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JAMES HORNER FILM MUSIC | December 10, 2016 |

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  • 1.  	Main Titles (03:02) 2.  	Beata viscera (02:21) traditional - performed by counter tenor Charles Brett 3.  	First Recognition (02:32) 4.  	The Lesson (04:21) 5.  	Kyrie (02:24) traditional - performed by The Choir of the Choir School Maria Schütz, Pasing - conducted by Kurt Rieth 6.  	The Scriptorium (03:54) 7.  	Veni sancte Spiritus (03:14) traditional - performed by The Choir of the Choir School Maria Schütz, Pasing - conducted by Kurt Rieth 8.  	The Confession (03:12) 9.  	Flashbacks (02:05) 10.  	The Discovery (02:29) 11.  	Betrayed (02:57) 12.  	Epilogue (06:09) 13.  	End Titles (03:12)



  • Sound engineer: Harry Schnitzler
    Music editor: Robert Hathaway
    Assistant music editor: Rainer Standke
    Synthesizer programming: Ian Underwood

  • Special Recent Posts

    CINEMA MUSICA: INTERVIEW WITH JAMES HORNER

    Conducted by Basil Boehni, Vice editor-in-chief of Cinema Musica. Held: 31 October 2011, in Frankfurt Am Main (Germany). Published in Cinema Musica in April 2012 (in German). The two photos of James Horner were taken by Matthias Keller.   Basil Boehni (BB): You’re working in the movie business for over 30 years very successfully. Can you still just sit back, relax and enjoy a movie or do you immediately jump into an analytical viewing of the film? James Horner: Well, when I’ve finished a film I really don’t ever watch the movie again. I see the movie when it’s been mixed – the music, the effects[...]

    eDIT FILMMAKER’S FESTIVAL: MASTER CLASS WITH JAMES HORNER

    Following several statements from James Horner from his Master Class talk conducted by Matthias Keller, Editor of Bavarian Radio, on 31 October 2011.   How he got into film music: I studied classical music and first wanted to become a classical composer. For getting commissions and grants you’re told to have a proper so-called power base. So I did the PHD and started writing ‘serious music’ (like Conversations and Spectral Shimmers). And one day I was asked to score a student film. And I agreed to it. I didn’t know anything about film. I wasn’t a great film buff. I was doing[...]

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    Up against very tight time constraints, James Horner succeeded in translating into music the essence, the very substance of what Jean-Jacques Annaud wanted to preserve from the immense opus by Umberto Eco. From this "millefeuille", as he called it, the director pulled a "palimpsest" by putting forward his own take on the name of the famous Rose (a riddle which even Umberto Eco wanted to be ... enigmatic) as well as a personal and emotional translation of a novel that he believed "was written for him." A project that was close to his heart and which he pulled off brilliantly,[...]

    ENEMY AT THE GATES: ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE EAST

    "I am a stone … I do not move…" Opening shot: two characters hunched down in the snow... immobile... waiting... silent. The strands of music come and go, thin and crystal-clear. (James Horner actually has built-in pauses for this scene, truly a rarity in film scoring.) The music is in a state of suspension, mirroring the calm before the storm that is about to descend upon Stalingrad. The music breathes as the characters do, with eerie strings drifting through the scales, reflecting the glances that the hunters and prey interchange. Acting instinctively, the old hunter is torn between hunger and fear,[...]

    HORNER / ANNAUD DOSSIER

    Dear readers, This month, Jean-Jacques Annaud's newest film, Wolf Totem will come out in China and France respectively on 19 and 25 February. In January, we had the chance to see this feature film, to listen to the music composed by James Horner, and to briefly discuss with director Jean-Jacques Annaud and film producer Xavier Castano. The latter informed us that Wolf Totem will soon be distributed worldwide including the US by Sony.   To celebrate this fourth collaboration between the American composer and the French director, we decided to dedicate a series of articles to them, through February. Feel free[...]



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