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JAMES HORNER FILM MUSIC | February 28, 2017 |

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  • 1.  	The Cornfield (05:34) 2.  	Deciding To Build The Field (05:51) 3.  	Shoeless Joe (02:14) 4.  	The Timeless Street (02:38) 5.  	Old Ball Players (02:44) 6.  	The Drive Home (02:13) 7.  	Field Of Dreams (03:30) 8.  	The Library (02:29) 9.  	Moonlight Graham (02:03) 10.  	Night Mists (04:19) 11.  	Doc's Memories (03:17) 12.  	The Place Where Dreams Come True (09:06) 13.  	End Credits (04:07)


  • Orchestrations: James Horner, Billy May
    Sound engineer: Shawn Murphy
    Musicians: Tommy Tedesco, Ian Underwood, Ralph Grierson, Tim May, Steve Schaeffer, Neil Stubenhaus, James Thatcher, Mike Taylor, Tony Hinnigan
     
    Two-thirds of the music was not written score. It was therefore necessary to hire a transcriber to transcribe and drop music from ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers).

    Field Of Dreams marks the first collaboration between James Horner and director Phil Alden Robinson, before Sneakers and  Freedom Song.
    "Fields Of Dreams quickly became a little classical as well as in terms of cinematic music." (Phil Alden Robinson)

  • Special Recent Posts

    JAMES HORNER’S PLACE IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

    0 Introduction and terminology James Horner was one of film music’s greats. Understanding his talent requires thorough study of what made him an outstanding and influential individual composer, but also of the changing landscape of film music itself. What is it exactly that drew James Horner to film music back in the seventies? And what had so changed by the 2010s that it made him grow impatient with his trade? This text sets out to answer these questions and serve as an introduction to film music in general and to James Horner’s film music in particular.   The first part of this article[...]

    THE 33: FIRST SCORE SAMPLES

    The movie The 33, directed by Patricia Riggen, tells the story of the 33 Chilean miners who were trapped in a mine in the Atacama desert, 700 meters under the surface, when the mine caved in on 5. August 2010. For 69 days the miners were stuck as rescue teams on the surface, with the eyes of the world on them, struggled to find a way to get them out, all the while food and water was rapidly becoming scarce for the miners trapped below.   This kind of movie is exactly the sort James Horner looked for later in his career.[...]

    BAFTA GURU: A CONVERSATION WITH JAMES HORNER

    29 April 2015. With host Tommy Pearson and a small audience, an important 75 minutes was to unfold. It is disheartening to note that this, a typical but always insightful interview with Tommy Pearson, would be the last interview our late maestro would give before his sudden passing on June 22, 2015. With this in mind, the angelic manners of James Horner's conveyance of thought are ever more heartbreaking as he describes some of his career highlights and passions to Tommy and the audience. His wonderfully unique way thinking and speaking those thoughts will be as sorely missed as the mystical[...]

    CONVERSATION WITH JAMES HORNER

    "If you build it he will come ..." Just like Ray Kinsella, the character played by Kevin Costner in Field of Dreams, a voice (or rather my intuition) led me to create the Association and the James Horner Film Music website. Every minute, every hour spent working for this project was partly guided by an objective I held close in my heart: publish a new, previously unreleased conversation with James Horner. I gave myself five years to get there. Next January we will celebrate four years of JHFM... Unlike the composer, who never listens again to his old music and who never[...]

    AUSTRALIA, 1991: JAMES HORNER SEMINARS

    Having published interviews given in the early 80's to the CinemaScore magazine (see our article), we continue our exploration of the archives of the past with the publication of the two seminars which James Horner participated in, December 1991 in Australia.   That year, the Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS) was celebrating film music with a series of courses and activities to recognize and celebrate the contribution that music makes to the screen experience. James Horner had made the trip to take part in a variety of national activities intended to stimulate an atmosphere of appreciation for the work of[...]



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